Blogging Carnival on Bilingualism February 2011.

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I am pleased to announce the February edition of the monthly Blogging Carnival on Bilingualism.

What follows is a list of posts, written by bloggers from around the world, dedicated to the topic of bilingualism, multilingualism, language learning and raising bi (or multi) lingual and bi (or multi) cultural children.

If you would like to find out more about it, sign up for a newsletter, read previous carnivals, or find out how you can get more involved, Letizia Quaranta of Bilingue per Gioco is the organiser and the Carnival page is here. Regular Carnival goers should take note! This page has moved!

Without further ado…

For anyone setting out on the journey of raising bilingual children or for those thinking of changing their approach, Vanessa at Language, Music and More has written a very useful post summarizing the different approaches parents can take in raising their child bilingually, including a discussion of factors that might make one method more suitable than another. She has also taken the time to explode many of the myths surrounding bilinguals and bilingualism.

The curious incidents of polyglot children’s habit of making up languages in an attempt to make sense of the language systems they hear around them, as well as advice about how to cope with this is the subject of Maria’s post at Busy as a Bee in Paris.

Steffi from Mummy do That! also has some useful advice about the problem of fostering literacy in bilingual children, particularly those ‘at risk’ bilinguals who grow up in a bilingual home but in whose community only one of the languages is used.

Difficulties are also the topic of Smashedpea’s post at Intrepidly Bilingual, specifically the problem that playdates intended to allow children to use their minority language can be scuppered when you have two children who are determined to use the other language with each other.

For all those raising children bilingually who are not themselves native speakers of their target second language, Tamara at Non-Native Bilingualism has written an uplifting post about the difficulties of forming an emotional connection with your child if you are speaking to him or her in a language which is not your mother tongue – but how she has ultimately managed to do this herself.

Jen of Trilingual Trio is also interested in the difference between her expectations and the realities of the emotional bonds we form through language, both with respect to talking to our children and changing the language we speak to our significant others in.

And on a similar topic, we have an inspiring interview from Douglas Hofstader at Letizia’s Bilingue per Gioco blog, a man who raised his children bilingually in English and Italian, speaking only Italian to his children, despite not being  native speaker of Italian himself.

There is another profile of an Italian/English bilingual family, this time one  still in the process of raising bilingual children, and of their experiences of multicultural living at Sarah’s Bringing up Baby Bilingual.

In a moving post, Mamapoekie of Authentic Parenting focuses on the children’s perspective, specifically, her three year old daughter’s experience of culture shock when moving between Africa and the Belgium.

And Lauren of Hobo Mama has summarised her three and a half year old trilingual boy’s progress in each of his languages to date.

Her assessment if probably more generous than Lalou’s son’s idea of his competency in German at Laloulah, whose post also details her approach to building his confidence in his own abilities.

And a number of children this month are working on their own versions of that great children’s classic, Incy Wincy Spider. We have the Spanish version here at Tyeisha’s Tongue Tales and Babelmum’s children are mixing Arabic and English to produce Incy Wincy Ankaboot here at BabelKid.

But we also hear from an adult. Reinaldo of Life & Bits writes about the fact that there are different degrees of bilingualism and his own journey along the road to an impressive fluency in two languages.

This is also the subject of my post for this month’s carnival at Verbosity leads to unclear, inarticulate things, although I wouldn’t pretend to have achieved Reinaldo’s level of competency (yet).

Next month’s Blogging Carnival on Bilingualism will be hosted at Multilingual Mama‘s blog. Looking forward to it already!

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14 responses »

  1. Pingback: Degrees of Bilingualism « Life & Bits

  2. Pingback: Blogging Carnival on Bilingualism | Bilingue Per Gioco™

  3. What a fantastic line-up! Thanks for hosting at the last minute. I can’t wait to go through each and every one of them – such inspiration!

    I’m bummed that I missed it this time around. I’ll try to make sure to catch it next time!

    Cheers,
    Corey

  4. Pingback: The Bilingual Blogosphere

  5. Pingback: How To Set Up A Bilingual Classroom « Bilingual Montessori Education

  6. Pingback: ‚The young girl grew up with Strumpfelpeter, it only made sense in German.’ « Bilingual Montessori Education

  7. Pingback: Degrees of Bilingualism « Ápices de la Vida

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